Category Archives: Quotations

NORFOLK LITTLE THEATRE’S THE FOREIGNER: “BLASNY, BLASNY”

In the midst of perplexity, doubt, fear, anger, and uncertainty, laughter may be the fragrance that freshens the air.[i] Terry Lindvall,  Virginia Wesleyan University The air in and around Norfolk’s Little Theatre on Claremont Avenue  is definitely fresh courtesy of a satisfying production of Larry Shue’s 1983 farce, The Foreigner, featuring the fine acting of […]

THE MET”S SAMSON AND DALILA: THE 100TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE ARMISTICE

One hundred years ago, on November 2, 1918, the Metropolitan Opera opened its season with a Jubilee Victory Celebration of the end of World War One during a performance of Saint-Saens’ Samson and Dalila. Enrico Caruso, a fervent champion of the allied cause, had been  barnstorming the country with Al Jolson, George M Cohan,  and […]

THE VIRGINIA STAGE COMPANY: OUR TOWN AT THE WELLS

Thornton Wilder loved New Hampshire. Thornton Wilder spent parts of the summers of 1924, 1926, 1929, 1932, and 1937 as a resident of the MacDowell Colony in Peterborough, the southwestern New Hampshire town known as the “real” Grover’s Corners. As a poet he loved the sounds of the words, the cadences, the tones and hesitations […]

THE FERRYMAN – A MODERN IRISH TRAGEDY

Near the end of Jez Butterworth’s gripping new drama, The Ferryman, Uncle Pat, the aged family repository of education and lore, begins to read, “Here all the crowd streams, hurrying to the shores, women and men, pleading to make the crossing, stretching out their hands in longing for the far shore. But the boatman rows […]

IRISH REPERTORY THEATRE: ON BECKETT – THE CLOWN KNOWS

Under the unassuming surface, the four great initial plays of Samuel Beckett embrace the fundamental themes of existence and, like no others in English since Shakespeare’s, wrestle them to the ground. For each of mankind’s defeats – by faith, love, society, and mortality – Beckett conjures up a tremendous theatrical master image that, supported by […]